It’s No Line: The Best Cleveland Data Center DR

map lineSo, I was explaining to our marketing guy the other day about the “imaginary line” that has traditionally existed when building networks or implementing a disaster recovery strategy.  That being geographically separate is considered important for business continuity because of natural disasters.

I explained that when it comes to selecting a Cleveland Data Center, old school thinking might say that Cleveland is too close for disaster recovery. So he asks me – in his usual snarky way – are people afraid of a lake Erie Tsunami wiping out all of Northeast Ohio? Tectonic plate activity in the Midwest?And while he was merely trying to be funny – he makes a good point… what is more likely to impact a Cleveland Data Center… something man-made… or a natural disaster.

If your organization selects a data center too far from Cleveland – and, God forbid, another event like 9/11 happens… how will you get to your backup data center. remember, planes were grounded for nearly a week. Can your business be down for a week while you’re unable to reach your gear?

Beyond a terrorist attack, the past decade also brought us a significant power outage that lasted for days, stretching all the way East to New York and North to Canada. You know where it didn’t touch? Canton. It’s because Canton is not only on a separate power grid than Cleveland, but separate fiber carriers, separate access points.

Back to traditional thinking… looking for the magic line, be it the Mason Dixon line or the Mississippi River just doesn’t make sense anymore. Our capacity to create issues, or “disasters” is much more likely to impact your network than a volcano erupting in Akron.

For Northeast Ohio executives looking for DR for a Cleveland data center, look at the delineations and redundancies, not a line on the map.

swoodbridge

Article by:
Scott Woodbridge


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